Editing in Markdown

help

What is Markdown

Markdown is a super simple way to write text that includes basic formatting. This website uses Markdown because other text formats (for example Microsoft Word documents) can not be easily shared, versioned, or adapted for the web. Markdown is the defacto text format for most websites today–you’ve probably used it before!

This page is special. On the right is this page’s raw text, that is, what you as a user would type here.

Markdown features

Headings

Headings are defined with hashes, like so:

Level 1 Heading

Level 2 Heading

Level 3 Heading

Level 4 Heading

Level 5 Heading
Level 6 Heading

Inside a paragraph

You can add emphasis with asteriks or double asteriks. Emphasis can also be added with underscores or double underscores. You can strike out text by using two tilde (~~) characters. Markdown will do fancy things like automatically convert two hyphens (--) into an en dash (–), three (---) into an em-dash (—), and convert standard quote marks "'hello'" into fancy quote marks: “‘hello’”.

Footnotes1 are added with [^1] notation; you then must define your footnote. Uusually the next paragraph is fine but whereever you definie it, it will get automatically moved to the bottom of the page later.

Abbreviations, such as HTML, work similarily to footnotes. Once defined all words that match the abbreviation will get transformed. We typically define all abbreviations at the top of the page.

Unfortunately, things like super^script, sub_script are known not to work.

Lists

Numbered

  1. Item 1
  2. Item 2
  3. Item 3

Unumbered (bullets)

  • Argument one
  • Argument two
    • With a sub argument!
  • Argument three

Definition lists

term
meaning
another meaning
another term
another meaning

Horizontal rule


Tables

Header1 Header2 Header3
cell1 cell2 cell3
cell4 cell5 cell6
cell1 cell2 cell3
cell4 cell5 cell6
Foot1 Foot2 Foot3

Code

You can add one-line code snippets into a sentance by using the backtick character (`) to wrap some text. Here is an example: indices <- calc.indices(data). Inline code snippets are useful for highlighting values, like 42, as well as other things.

Blocks of code

def print_hi(name)
  puts "Hi, #{name}"
end
print_hi('Tom')
#=> prints 'Hi, Tom' to STDOUT.
# An example of some R code
> # We can use the print() function
> print("Hello World!")
[1] "Hello World!"

> # Quotes can be suppressed in the output
> print("Hello World!", quote = FALSE)
[1] Hello World!

> # If there are more than 1 item, we can concatenate using paste()
> print(paste("How","are","you?"))
[1] "How are you?"

Citations

Citations are not a normal part of Markdown. This website uses a special extension to make them work.

You can use citations inline on the page like this (Truskinger, Cottman-Fields, Eichinski, Towsey, & Roe, 2014).

We can also add a quote block for a publication and then cite their work.

(Truskinger, Cottman-Fields, Eichinski, Towsey, & Roe, 2014)

Any citations you use must be added to the website’s references file. All citations used on a page will be automatically included in the page bibliography.

Math

Support for math is achieved with another non-standard extension to Makrdown. Math support uses LaTeX syntax. Inline equations can be added by wrapping the LaTeX equation in two dollar symbols ($$). Here is an example: and a more complex example: .

There’s also support for showing equations as paragraphs. To do this just put the equation on it’s own line with a line break before and after. Here are some examples:

  1. The definition of the footnote! 

*[HTML]: Hyper Text Markup Language

# What is Markdown

Markdown is a super simple way to write text that includes basic formatting.
This website uses Markdown because other text formats (for example Microsoft 
Word documents) can not be easily shared, versioned, or adapted for the web.
Markdown is the defacto text format for most websites today--you've probably
used it before!

**This page is special**. On the right is this page's raw text, that is, what _you_ 
as a user would type [here]({% include this-page-in-gh.html option='raw' %}). 

# Markdown features

## Headings

Headings are defined with hashes, like so:

# Level 1 Heading
## Level 2 Heading
### Level 3 Heading
#### Level 4 Heading
##### Level 5 Heading
###### Level 6 Heading








## Inside a paragraph

You can add emphasis with  *asteriks* or double **asteriks**. Emphasis can also
be added with _underscores_ or double __underscores__. You can ~~strike out 
text~~ by using two tilde (`~~`) characters. Markdown will do fancy things like
automatically convert two hyphens (`--`) into an en dash (--), three (`---`) 
into an em-dash (---), and convert standard quote marks `"'hello'"` into fancy
quote marks: "'hello'".

Footnotes[^1] are added with `[^1]` notation; you then must define your footnote.
Uusually the next paragraph is fine but whereever you definie it, it will get
automatically moved to the bottom of the page later.

[^1]: The definition of the footnote!

Abbreviations, such as HTML, work similarily to footnotes. Once defined all
words that match the abbreviation will get transformed. We typically define all
abbreviations at the top of the page.

Unfortunately, things like super^script, sub_script are known not to work.

## Lists

### Numbered

1. Item 1
1. Item 2
1. Item 3

### Unumbered (bullets)

- Argument one
- Argument two
  - With a sub argument!
- Argument three

### Definition lists

term
: meaning
: another meaning

another term
: another meaning



## Horizontal rule

--- 


## Tables

| Header1 | Header2 | Header3 |
|:--------|:-------:|--------:|
| cell1   | cell2   | cell3   |
| cell4   | cell5   | cell6   |
| cell1   | cell2   | cell3   |
| cell4   | cell5   | cell6   |
|=====
| Foot1   | Foot2   | Foot3   |






## Code

You can add one-line code snippets into a sentance by using the backtick
character (`` ` ``) to wrap some text. Here is an example: 
`indices <- calc.indices(data)`. Inline code snippets are useful for highlighting
values, like `42`,  as well as other things.

### Blocks of code

{% highlight ruby %}
def print_hi(name)
  puts "Hi, #{name}"
end
print_hi('Tom')
#=> prints 'Hi, Tom' to STDOUT.
{% endhighlight %}


```r
# An example of some R code
> # We can use the print() function
> print("Hello World!")
[1] "Hello World!"

> # Quotes can be suppressed in the output
> print("Hello World!", quote = FALSE)
[1] Hello World!

> # If there are more than 1 item, we can concatenate using paste()
> print(paste("How","are","you?"))
[1] "How are you?"
```
 




# Citations

Citations are not a normal part of Markdown. This website uses a special
extension to make them work.

You can use citations inline on the page like this {% cite Truskinger2014 %}.

{% quote Truskinger2014 %}
We can also add a quote block for a publication and then cite their work.
{% endquote %}

Any citations you use must be added to the website's references file.
All citations used on a page will be automatically included in the page
bibliography.



# Math

Support for math is achieved with another non-standard extension to Makrdown.
Math support uses LaTeX syntax. Inline equations can be added by wrapping the
LaTeX equation in two dollar symbols (`$$`). Here is an example:
$$a^2 + b^2 = c^2$$ and a more complex example:
$$ \mathbf{X}_{n,p} = \mathbf{A}_{n,k} \mathbf{B}_{k,p} $$.

There's also support for showing equations as paragraphs. To do this just put
the equation on it's own line with a line break before and after. Here are some
examples:

$$a^2 + b^2 = c^2$$

$$ \mathsf{Data = PCs} \times \mathsf{Loadings} $$

$$ \mathbf{X}_{n,p} = \mathbf{A}_{n,k} \mathbf{B}_{k,p} $$
        

Page Metadata

Contributions: 3
Contributors: 1
Additions: 203, Deletions: 26
Created by: Anthony Truskinger on 2017-08-14 22:57:39 +00:00
Last edited by Anthony Truskinger on 2017-08-14 22:57:39 +00:00

All contributors:

  1. Anthony Truskinger 3

Bibliography

  1. Truskinger, A., Cottman-Fields, M., Eichinski, P., Towsey, M., & Roe, P. (2014). Practical Analysis of Big Acoustic Sensor Data for Environmental Monitoring. In 2014 IEEE Fourth International Conference on Big Data and Cloud Computing (pp. 91–98). https://doi.org/10.1109/BDCloud.2014.29